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Lyndhurst, Bank and
 Emery Down history - an introduction

An 1880s view of Lyndhurst
An 1880s view of Lyndhurst

The history of Lyndhurst, Bank and Emery Down is long and fascinating.

Some aspects reflect the New Forest's original role as a Norman hunting ground, whilst other aspects of Lyndhurst's history are connected to the village's historical position as Capital of the New Forest.

Much of the evidence of Lyndhurst's history can still be seen today, and provides many opportunities for exploration, whilst Bank, Emery Down (and Swan Green) offer just as much of interest.

Explore, for example, Lyndhurst's Alice In Wonderland connection, and learn about the 'old' Parish Church and Parkhill. Find out about Queen's House and the ancient Verderers' Hall. Walk along the New Forest Salt Way and Beechen Lane, visit the site of Lyndhurst Race Ground, and discover why George III and William Cobbett had an interest in Cuffnells, a mansion once located on the outskirts of Lyndhurst.

Consider, too, the military history of Lyndhurst's White Moor, and whilst wandering over this now peaceful heathland, pause for a moment to contemplate the likely thoughts of men long ago, training here whilst awaiting postings to the horrors of First World War trenches.

The 17th Division leaving Lyndhurst en-route to the First World War battlefields, as shown on a contemporary postcard
The 17th Division leaving Lyndhurst en-route
to the First World War battlefields,
as shown on a contemporary postcard

Find out more about Lyndhurst, Bank and Emery Down's fascinating history

and finally, find out more about Lyndhurst, Bank and Emery Down's history as revealed on these old maps

and in these old pictures

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** New Forest ponies **
New Forest ponies in the road
Ponies, cattle, pigs, sheep and donkeys are a popular part of the New Forest scene, but during the first six months of 2018, 36 animals were killed or injured on Forest roads, compared with 26 in the same period in 2017, a shocking rise of 38%. And in the full year, 63 animals were killed on the roads compared to 56 in 2017.
** Always take care when driving **
New Forest seasonal highlights
May
Bluebells and other wild flowers brighten the woods, usually in relatively small numbers.
Bird song can be heard throughout the day but is at its loudest at dawn and, to a lesser extent, dusk.
Foals are born in increasing numbers and can be seen beside ever-attentive mares.
Dragonflies are more frequently observed on the wing as spring progresses.

June
Badgers can now often be watched above ground well before darkness falls.
Deer - fallow, red, roe, sika and muntjac deer are all present - give birth, although the youngsters are unlikely to be noticed until July.
Heath spotted-orchids add delicate pink colour to many of the heaths.
Hobbies, dashing birds of prey, can often be seen aloft, hawking for insects.
New Forest 'what's on' - a small
selection of local events and activities
May 2019
Saturday, 4th - Lyndhurst Community Centre, Craft, Gift and Produce Fair, 10.00am - 4.00pm.
Friday, 10th - Brockenhurst Village Hall, Film night, Bohemian Rhapsody (12A), 7.00pm - 10.30pm.
Wednesday, 22nd - New Forest Heritage Centre, Lyndhurst, A Forester's Career - an evening with Harry Oram, 7.00pm - 9.30pm.
Saturday, 25th - Burley Village Hall, Songbirds concert.

June 2019
Sunday, 2nd - Lymington Open Gardens, various locations, 2.00pm - 6.00pm.
Friday, 7th - Lyndhurst, Verderers' Hall Open Day, 11.00am - 3.00pm.
Friday, 21st - Exbury Gardens, The Secret Garden - open air performance, 7.00pm.

For further details, view the full New Forest What's on programme.
Content produced by Andrew Walmsley
Content produced by Andrew Walmsley