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Lyndhurst

The historic 'Capital of the New Forest'

Lyndhurst:
did you know?


Lyndhurst is also the name of a town in Bergen County, New Jersey.
Lyndhurst until the 1980s had another pub - the Volunteer Arms, located where Austin and Wyatt is now.
Lyndhurst smithy used to be close to the current post office.
Buzzards can often be seen soaring high over the centre of Lyndhurst.
Lyndhurst had its own cinema, the Plaza, which was where Budgens supermarket is now.
Bolton's Bench, on the outskirts of Lyndhurst, was named after an 18th century Duke of Bolton.
Roe deer visit many Lyndhurst gardens - to sample plants and shrubs.
Pikes Hill, to the north of Lyndhurst village centre, is shown on old maps as Pigs Hill.
Lyndhurst's Crown Hotel was once a coaching inn.
Lyndhurst used to be the centre of a thriving butterfly collecting trade.
Lyndhurst: the view from near Bolton's Bench
Lyndhurst: the view
from near Bolton's Bench

Lyndhurst is often thought of as the Capital of the New Forest - it enjoys a broadly central location, is surrounded by relatively fertile land, and stands at a junction of historic routes.

Lyndhurst had its own Royal manor house, and was - and still is - home of the Verderers’ Hall, the meeting place of the ancient Verderers’ Court whose history stretches back to at least the 13th century.

Lyndhurst race ground was, until the late-19th century, a popular attraction; and Lyndhurst used to be the home of the New Forest pony sales.

Lyndhurst: Capital of the New Forest? Absolutely!

Lyndhurst - what's in a name?

Lyndhurst: the name in its earlier form, Lindhyrst, dates back to at least Anglo-Saxon times, and means ‘lime wood’, although Lyndhurst now, in common with much of Britain, has few lime trees.

Lyndhurst - landscapes

Lyndhurst was well-described in the mid-19th century by John Wise, who remarked: ‘The people of Lyndhurst ought, I always think, to be the happiest and most contented in England, for they possess a wider park and nobler trees than even Royalty. You cannot leave the place in any direction without going through the Forest.

And today, John Wise's comments still apply - woodlands lap against the outskirts of Lyndhurst, inviting exploration by walkers and cyclists along many miles of gravel tracks and countless lesser used paths.

But the area around Lyndhurst comprises heathlands, too, heathlands that in spring are yellow with gorse, and in summer richly purple with heather blooms. These are places that hold abundant wildlife, including many species that are not often encountered elsewhere.

Lyndhurst - families and fresh air

Lyndhurst is a great place for families to enjoy fresh air and wide, open spaces, for around Bolton's Bench, within walking distance of Lyndhurst village centre, are extensive grasslands with turf kept short by commoners' stock - the ponies, donkeys and cattle that can be seen throughout the area.

Here, there is ample room to play football, cricket and other ball games; to fly kites, watch the cricket or just relax with book or newspaper.

Lyndhurst - landmarks

As befits the Capital of the New Forest, the local Forestry Commission headquarters are located in Lyndhurst - in Queen’s House, at the very top of Lyndhurst High Street; whilst close by is Lyndhurst's splendidly Gothic, Victorian parish church of St. Michael and All Angels with its impressive 49 metre (160 foot) spire.

Lyndhurst also hosts the New Forest Centre. Situated in Lyndhurst's main car park, it is a purpose-built red brick building housing the New Forest Museum, Gift Shop, Reference Library and New Forest Tourist Information Office.

Opened in 1988 by the Duke of Edinburgh, the museum has displays illustrative of New Forest life in days gone-by, and is a ‘must-visit’ for anybody with an interest in the New Forest and its history. The Christopher Tower New Forest Reference Library on the upper floor also has a wide range of local interest books and other documents.

Lyndhurst: cattle and cottages at nearby Swan Green
Lyndhurst: cattle and cottages
at nearby Swan Green

At the opposite end of Lyndhurst car park, Lyndhurst Community Centre offers refreshments on Saturday mornings, and is the year-round venue for a wide range of events and activities - antique auctions, craft and gift fairs, book fairs, farmers' markets and more.

Lyndhurst - places to eat, drink and stay

Lyndhurst today is well-served by shops, tea rooms, pubs and restaurants. There are five pubs, for example, all of which serve food; whilst the nearby hamlets of Bank, Emery Down and Swan Green boast another three pubs that also have well-respected kitchens.

Those seeking out a restaurant in which to eat will not be disappointed, either - Lyndhurst has Italian, Indian and Thai restaurants, and others associated with the local hotels - a veritable gourmet's delight.

And those wanting accommodation in Lyndhurst can choose from a number of hotels, guesthouses, and bed and breakfast establishments; whilst nearby Pondhead Farm offers its own camping facilities.

Lyndhurst:
did you know?


Lyndhurst is also the name of a town in Bergen County, New Jersey.
Lyndhurst until the 1980s had another pub - the Volunteer Arms, located where Austin and Wyatt is now.
Lyndhurst smithy used to be close to the current post office.
Buzzards can often be seen soaring high over the centre of Lyndhurst.
Lyndhurst had its own cinema, the Plaza, which was where Budgens supermarket is now.
Bolton's Bench, on the outskirts of Lyndhurst, was named after an 18th century Duke of Bolton.
Roe deer visit many Lyndhurst gardens - to sample plants and shrubs.
Pikes Hill, to the north of Lyndhurst village centre, is shown on old maps as Pigs Hill.
Lyndhurst's Crown Hotel was once a coaching inn.
Lyndhurst used to be the centre of a thriving butterfly collecting trade.
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Lyndhurst Community News
Lyndhurst Community Club
The Community Club Christmas Tea will be held on Friday, 15th December at 2.30pm at the Community Centre. Tickets - £5.00 each - are available from the Community Centre office. These lunches are always very popular so do get your tickets as early as possible. If you aren't able to go in to the Community Centre for your ticket, just ring 023 8028 2267.

Christmas Songs and Carols
The Friends of Lyndhurst Surgery have organised a concert of Christmas Songs and Carols for Friday, December 15th at 6.30pm at St Michael and All Angels Church, featuring performances by the young people of the Lyndhurst iSing choir, followed by the more mature members of Lyndhurst Community Choir. There's also a little poetry and audience participation, too. Tickets are £8.00 each from the Community Centre or pay at the door. Includes refreshments of wine, juice and water, all with a mince pie.

Film Night at the Community Centre
The showing for December (Friday 15th) will be "Going In Style". Desperate to pay the bills and come through for their loved ones, three lifelong pals risk it all by embarking on a daring bid to knock off the very bank that absconded with their money. Starring Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin. Directed by Zach Braff.
Tickets are available in advance from the Community Centre office at £5.00 each (or £4.50 for Community Centre members). As always, it would be really helpful if you could buy your tickets prior to the showing to give some idea of numbers.

Local Charity Partners with new Lyndhurst Southern Co-op Store
A local community charity has been selected as the fundraising partner for a new Southern Co-op store on the High Street in Lyndhurst, receiving a £1,000 donation followed by a year's partnership with the new store, which opened on 3rd November.
Alana Bubb, Manager at Lyndhurst Community Centre said: "The purpose of the Lyndhurst and District Community Association is to promote the advancement of education and provision of facilities to encourage people to be more active, improve social welfare, wellbeing and community cohesion. This donation will enable the Community Centre to improve its facilities to ensure that we are able to meet the needs of our local community.
On behalf of the Community Centre I'd like to thank Southern Co-op for this generous donation. We are thrilled to have been chosen as this new store's charity partner."
Charities and community groups can also apply for cash donations or goods in kind through the 'Love Your Neighbourhood' scheme, which is funded by the 5p single-use carrier bag levy. For more information on how to apply, please speak to your local store manager, or visit the Co-op's website.

New Forest ponies
New Forest ponies in the road
New Forest ponies, cattle, pigs, sheep and donkeys are a popular part of the New Forest scene, but in 2015, 55 were killed on the roads.
Always take care when driving
Content produced by Andrew Walmsley
Content produced by Andrew Walmsley